Modus Operandi and First Name Conventions

We are running a genealogy research project. That's why we stick to scientific principles such as sharing all the data sources to allow the reproduction of the lines of thought. Our results need to be well documented, accuracy and validity are top priority.

Modus Operandi

All data presented in our Family Trees section has to be based on reliable sources. Typically people can trace the names and key data of their ancestors back for one or two generations and verify by asking other family members. The further in the past, the more important are written documents. 

Sometimes genealogical data gathered during our research needs interpretation. For example, if there are obvious errors in documents that are considered valid sources otherwise, like typos in birth, death or wedding records. To still be able to use those sources without jeopardising the accuracy of our results, we meticulousely document all steps in the process in order to allow others to check and validate or falsify.

First Name Conventions

First names of people are often spelled differently, mostly due to variations and evolution in dialect and written language over time. As it is very difficult to compare data entries across variations of the same first name, we tend to use the most common version in our database. If a different version is used in the source files, then this is always mentioned in the comments section of the person's details page. We do not standardise the names of entries which are very well documented, typically that's the case for persons that were born in the second half of the 20th century or later.

Here's the list of names that are (or are to be) standardised:

  • Alfonso, for: Affonso, Afonso.
  • Anna, for: Anetta.
  • Antonia, for: Antonietta.
  • Assunta, for: Asunta.
  • Bartolomeo, for: Bartalomeio, Bortolo, Borto.
  • Basilio, for: Baseio, Baseggio, Basegio (first or middle names).
  • Cattarina, for: Catharina, Caterina, Chattarina.
  • Giorgio, for: Zorzi.
  • Giovanni, for: Gioanni, Zuane, Zuani, Zuanni, Zan.
  • Paolo, for: Polo. Not for modern variations like Paulo (in Portuguese).
  • Santo, for: Sante.
  • Umberto, for: Humberto.
(This list is continuously being updated.)